'Tighten the Screws, and Fear Not the Tigers Oath', 2011, Michael Pajon

'Tighten the Screws, and Fear Not the Tigers Oath', 2011, Michael Pajon

posted : Thursday, November 10th, 2011

'The Moon Crouched Low, Casting Pale Shadows Over Dancers, Diggers, and Debris', 2011, Michael Pajon

'The Moon Crouched Low, Casting Pale Shadows Over Dancers, Diggers, and Debris', 2011, Michael Pajon

posted : Thursday, November 10th, 2011

'atari and the cold war', 2011, Aris Moore

"…when I was little I had a dream about nuclear war. I was outside by myself and good and plenty’s were coming down at an angle from the sky, when they hit my skin they sizzled. I think it was side effects of the cold war and atari."

'atari and the cold war', 2011, Aris Moore

"…when I was little I had a dream about nuclear war. I was outside by myself and good and plenty’s were coming down at an angle from the sky, when they hit my skin they sizzled. I think it was side effects of the cold war and atari."

posted : Sunday, November 6th, 2011

'untitled', 2011, Sergio Velazquez

'untitled', 2011, Sergio Velazquez

posted : Thursday, November 3rd, 2011

'A Submariners tail' (diptych), 2011, Flannon Jackson

'A Submariners tail' (diptych), 2011, Flannon Jackson

posted : Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

'A Submariner’s Tale' (diptych), 2011, Flannon Jackson

From Secondary Histories 

A Submariner’s Tale

 

Launched in the early days of the Cold War on October 21 1950, the S-81 was a Project 613 series boat, referred to by NATO as a Whiskey Class Submarine.  Far from being the pride of the Soviet fleet the S-81 was a workman like boat with an unassuming history.  Built at the Krasnoye Sormovo Factory No. 112 in Nizhny Novgorod along the Volga, she was transferred by inland waterway to Baku along the Caspian Sea for sea trials, followed by delivery to the Northern Fleet when she was commissioned on December 2nd, 1952.  Due to certain logistical issues having to do with estuarial water levels and unusual tidal flows owing to the blue moon of December of 1952, the S-81 was late coming on station. It only managed to join the fleet during the concluding days of exercises in the Sea of Okhotsk, where it participated in the Kurile Maneuvers, a show of force in response to the recent American Japanese aggression pact.

 

In July of 1957, the S-81 went in to dry dock at the ship works in Severodvinsk where it was overhauled and converted to a Project 644 boat.  Shedding its torpedoes, the S-81 was fitted with two SS-N-3 anti-ship missiles.  Recommissioned in April of 1959, she was one of the last diesel attack submarines of the Soviet Navy. As across the yard at Severodvinsk, they were rapidly nearing completion of the K-19 nuclear attack submarine, which itself would launch on October 11th 1959.

 

In the late summer of 1962, S-81 was deployed in support of the Freighter Omsk, the first of two freighters to unload cargo in Havana harbor during Operation Anadyr, but the boat never arrived at its rendezvous point just east of the Straight of Gibraltar.  Having set sail out of Murmansk on August 17th, S-81 suffered a failure of its automatic snorkel valve forcing the boat to the surface in the Norwegian Sea.  Concerned that the presence of an attack submarine would draw American scrutiny to the increasing sea traffic as Operation Anadyr got underway, the Captain of S-81 was ordered to broadcast his plight on open radio frequencies.  With the sinking of its sister boat the previous year due to a similar snorkel valve problem, this was one of those rare moments where the truth was the best means of concealing the truth.  Receiving escort from a nearby Soviet trawler, S-81 arrived back in port at the beginning of September and was still in dry dock while repairs were being completed on October 27th.

 

The end of its unassuming career came in March 1987 when S-81 was decommissioned, returned to Krasnoye Sormovo Factory and stripped for scrap.  After the fall of the Soviet Union the Krasnoye Sormovo Factory, through a series of sales and receiverships ended up as a subsidiary of the United Machinebuilding Factories Corporation.

posted : Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

"Untitled" (Security), 2011, Rita Koehler

"Untitled" (Security), 2011, Rita Koehler

posted : Monday, October 31st, 2011

'SubMission', 2011, ASD

'SubMission', 2011, ASD

posted : Monday, October 31st, 2011

Chomsky explains the gravity of the Oct 27th situation.  

posted : Sunday, October 30th, 2011

posted : Thursday, October 27th, 2011

JFK Speech on the Cuban Missile Crisis (Part 1)

posted : Thursday, October 27th, 2011

“ The missile crisis "was the most dangerous moment in human history," Arthur Schlesinger commented in October 2002 at a conference on the fortieth anniversary of the crisis, attended by a number of those who witnessed it from within as it unfolded. Decision-makers at the time undoubtedly understood that the fate of the world was in their hands. Nevertheless, attendees at the conference may have been shocked by some of the revelations. They were informed that in October 1962 the world was "one word away" from nuclear war.
— Noam Chomsky Hegemony or Survival

posted : Thursday, October 27th, 2011

'CovE Hurt Ax Shun', 2011, Andres Hernandez

'CovE Hurt Ax Shun', 2011, Andres Hernandez

posted : Thursday, October 27th, 2011

'Freedom is not free', 2011, Robert Bern

'Freedom is not free', 2011, Robert Bern

posted : Thursday, October 27th, 2011

'My Small Problem', 2011, Julie Lindell

'My Small Problem', 2011, Julie Lindell

posted : Thursday, October 27th, 2011